Next meet-up: SitP 2014-08-25

Mt View Hotel, Bridge Rd, Richmond.
Image: Mattinbgn / WikiMedia Commons

Our next meet-up is the Melbourne Skeptics in the Pub on Monday 25 August, 2014.

As usual we meet at the Mount View Hotel, 70 Bridge Road in Richmond from 18:00 (6pm) onwards. Find us upstairs in the lounge, grab a meal and a drink as you please, and chat with other freethinkers!

Next meet-up: SitP 2014-07-28

Mt View Hotel, Bridge Rd, Richmond.
Image: Mattinbgn / WikiMedia Commons

Our next meet-up is the Melbourne Skeptics in the Pub on Monday 28 July, 2014.

As usual we meet at the Mount View Hotel, 70 Bridge Road in Richmond from 18:00 (6pm) onwards. Find us upstairs in the lounge, grab a meal and a drink as you please, and chat with other freethinkers!

Bruno Gröning Circle of Friends: 1950s spiritualist quackery in Melbourne

image of Bruno Gröning

Bruno Gröning (1906–1959)

I received a pamphlet in the mailbox last night, complete with a slip announcing a monthly “information lecture”, for the “Bruno Gröning Circle of Friends”.

What on Earth is a Germany-based group, devoted to the quack claims of a German mystic in the 1950s, doing active in Melbourne?

During the fifties he sparked interest from the public around the world through extraordinary healing successes and he left behind the knowledge about how to take in a spiritual healing power, the “Heilstrom”. Healings occur today as back then, even of incurable diseases. Numerous medically documented success reports demonstrate the current effects of his teaching.

“A Selection of Five Success Reports” is on one page, which are all personal testimonials (not “medically documented”) about angina, depression, asthma, allergies, migraine, and back pain — nothing about “incurable diseases”, and nothing about medical diagnosis or verification.

The insert announces a schedule of lectures, most in months gone by. But one is coming up this month on 2014-06-13, at East Melbourne Library, 122 George Street, East Melbourne (map).

Would there be value in skeptics going along? We might like to ask questions before the assembled audience and have them answered for everyone to hear; but “information lecture” sounds more like preaching with no opportunity for public Q&A.

Next meet-up: SitP 2014-06-23

Mt View Hotel, Bridge Rd, Richmond.
Image: Mattinbgn / WikiMedia Commons

Our next meet-up is the Melbourne Skeptics in the Pub on Monday 23 June, 2014.

As usual we meet at the Mount View Hotel, 70 Bridge Road in Richmond from 18:00 (6pm) onwards. Find us upstairs in the lounge, grab a meal and a drink as you please, and chat with other freethinkers!

The stubborn persistence of false beliefs

Maria Konnikova at The New Yorker gives us a familiar truth phrased in understatement:

Until recently, attempts to correct false beliefs haven’t had much success.

In Why do people persist in believing things that just aren’t true? she reports on recent research into the factors influencing the stubbornness of people’s false views of the world.

One such researcher is Brendan Nyhan, who did a longitudinal study into how the beliefs of parents changed on the topic of childhood vaccination, before and after various kinds of pro-vaccination campaign.

The result was dramatic: a whole lot of nothing. None of the interventions worked. The first leaflet—focussed on a lack of evidence connecting vaccines and autism—seemed to reduce misperceptions about the link, but it did nothing to affect intentions to vaccinate. It even decreased intent among parents who held the most negative attitudes toward vaccines, a phenomenon known as the backfire effect. The other two interventions fared even worse: the images of sick children increased the belief that vaccines cause autism, while the dramatic narrative somehow managed to increase beliefs about the dangers of vaccines. “It’s depressing,” Nyhan said. “We were definitely depressed,” he repeated, after a pause.

Stephan Lewandowsky has conducted psychological research into how humans treat misinformation and correction: a series of studies presented a scenario, with or without racial information, followed by retracting or not retracting the racial information.

Everyone’s memory worked correctly: the students could all recall the details of the crime and could report precisely what information was or wasn’t retracted. But the students who scored highest on racial prejudice continued to rely on the racial misinformation that identified the perpetrators as Aboriginals, even though they knew it had been corrected. They answered the factual questions accurately, stating that the information about race was false, and yet they still relied on race in their inference responses, saying that the attackers were likely Aboriginal or that the store owner likely had trouble understanding them because they were Aboriginal. This was, in other words, a laboratory case of the very dynamic that Nyhan identified: strongly held beliefs continued to influence judgment, despite correction attempts—even with a supposedly conscious awareness of what was happening.

The growing impression is that false beliefs are easy to change *only* if they are not tied to the person’s self identity or group identity.

If someone asked you to explain the relationship between the Earth and the sun, you might say something wrong: perhaps that the sun rotates around the Earth, rising in the east and setting in the west. A friend who understands astronomy may correct you. It’s no big deal; you simply change your belief.

But imagine living in the time of Galileo, when understandings of the Earth-sun relationship were completely different, and when that view was tied closely to ideas of the nature of the world, the self, and religion. What would happen if Galileo tried to correct your belief? The process isn’t nearly as simple. The crucial difference between then and now, of course, is the importance of the misperception. When there’s no immediate threat to our understanding of the world, we change our beliefs. It’s when that change contradicts something we’ve long held as important that problems occur.

This important difference informs possible improvements in approaches to correct false beliefs that are unfortunately tied to a person’s identity.

Normally, self-affirmation is reserved for instances in which identity is threatened in direct ways: race, gender, age, weight, and the like. Here, Nyhan decided to apply it in an unrelated context: Could recalling a time when you felt good about yourself make you more broad-minded about highly politicized issues, like the Iraq surge or global warming? As it turns out, it would. On all issues, attitudes became more accurate with self-affirmation, and remained just as inaccurate without. That effect held even when no additional information was presented—that is, when people were simply asked the same questions twice, before and after the self-affirmation.

Still, as Nyhan is the first to admit, it’s hardly a solution that can be applied easily outside the lab. “People don’t just go around writing essays about a time they felt good about themselves,” he said. And who knows how long the effect lasts—it’s not as though we often think good thoughts and then go on to debate climate change.

The message is a poingnant and important one for skeptics:

Facts and evidence, for one, may not be the answer everyone thinks they are: they simply aren’t that effective, given how selectively they are processed and interpreted. Instead, why not focus on presenting issues in a way keeps broader notions out of it—messages that are not political, not ideological, not in any way a reflection of who you are?

Next meet-up: SitP 2014-05-26

Mt View Hotel, Bridge Rd, Richmond.
Image: Mattinbgn / WikiMedia Commons

Our next meet-up is the Melbourne Skeptics in the Pub on Monday 26 May, 2014.

As usual we meet at the Mount View Hotel, 70 Bridge Road in Richmond from 18:00 (6pm) onwards. Find us upstairs in the lounge, grab a meal and a drink as you please, and chat with other freethinkers!

New-Age Bullshit Generator

In the same spirit as other tools[0], Seb Pearce brings us the New-Age Bullshit Generator.

Now you too can have a page of shallow platitudes and mystical vacuity (“To walk the myth is to become one with it. Transcendence is the growth of being, and of us.…”) which may be indistinguishable from the output of real-life gurus.

[0]: Some readers will also know Wisdom of Chopra and other tools.

Next meet-up: SitP 2014-04-28

Mt View Hotel, Bridge Rd, Richmond.
Image: Mattinbgn / WikiMedia Commons

Our next meet-up is the Melbourne Skeptics in the Pub on Monday 28 April, 2014.

As usual we meet at the Mount View Hotel, 70 Bridge Road in Richmond from 18:00 (6pm) onwards. Find us upstairs in the lounge, grab a meal and a drink as you please, and chat with other freethinkers!

Next meet-up: SitP 2014-03-24

Mt View Hotel, Bridge Rd, Richmond.
Image: Mattinbgn / WikiMedia Commons

Our next meet-up is the Melbourne Skeptics in the Pub on Monday 24 March, 2014.

As usual we meet at the Mount View Hotel, 70 Bridge Road in Richmond from 18:00 (6pm) onwards. Find us upstairs in the lounge, grab a meal and a drink as you please, and chat with other freethinkers!

Next meet-up: SitP 2014-02-24

Mt View Hotel, Bridge Rd, Richmond.
Image: Mattinbgn / WikiMedia Commons

Our next meet-up is the Melbourne Skeptics in the Pub on Monday 24 February, 2014.

As usual we meet at the Mount View Hotel, 70 Bridge Road in Richmond from 18:00 (6pm) onwards. Find us upstairs in the lounge, grab a meal and a drink as you please, and chat with other freethinkers!